e-rag-ication

“Allergy season” is most commonly associated with the first full blooms of the spring, but for those of you that are itching and sneezing come late-July, this might be your guy. Or, like, not your guy. Like you must hate this guy.

What I’m trying to say is that there’s this plant, called Ragweed, that doesn’t begin to release its pollen until the tail end of July, and we seem to have it in abundance this year not only in the WestCo Courtyard, but in Connecticut as a whole (as far as I’ve seen from highway drives).

There's a good variety of ragweed out there, but this is what ours looks like.

There’s a good variety of ragweed out there, but this is what ours looks like.

 

Allergy symptoms for ragweed are apparently similar to a food allergy: itching and burning throat, runny face holes (AKA those things called noses and eyes), and hives, among the less common but possible vomiting and breathing issues.

ZZW-dog-allergies

Dogs can get a ragweed allergy, too! Check ‘em before they wreck ‘em…selves.

 

We’re no highway cleanup crew (officially), so you might have to go windows-up whilst driving the highway this coming week. But the WILD Wes team wants to look out for you as best we can, so we pulled all the volunteer ragweed up from WestCo in these past few days before the plants start their pollination cycle. You should be relatively good to go if you’d like to cut through the area or check out all the crazy cool bugs and munch on some kale.

Best wishes for your health and sanity when the ragweed blooms,
Rina

 

The Enemy is Upon Us

Popillia japonica, or the “Japanese Beetle”

What’s funny is that these guys are not a bother in Japan - natural predators control their populations to non-destructive, stable levels. Here in The States, however, they have taken the East by storm, turning entire mature trees into mere skeletons.

Did ya know that was a real thing? I wasn't just exercising my figurative language skills. "Skeletonizing" is when the bugs only eat the leaf tissue, but leave the vascular matter (or veins) in place. You've probably seen skeletonized leaves around, whether the skeletonization was due to natural decomposition or predation.

Did ya know that was a real thing? I wasn’t just exercising my figurative language skills. “Skeletonizing” is when the bugs only eat the leaf tissue, but – leaf – the vascular matter (or veins) in place. You’ve probably seen skeletonized leaves around, whether the skeletonization was due to natural decomposition or predation.

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